What I will miss about my online MSC #1

Now it might be very librarian of me to say that I will miss the library…but I will.

Once my access to the, easy to use single-sign-on, university portal ends I will not be able to access the various ejournals I have kept an eye on over the three years, many in areas such as business and health not directly related to the education/technology schools of my course.  In the form of non-Open Access journals the publishers are effectively helping the universities maintain a legacy control on knowledge from the pre-web era.

Certainly I opted for the course I did knowing I could use the excellent SCONUL Access scheme.  SCONUL Access allows students, at participating UK Higher Education institutions, to visit other physical collections.  However, it was the ejournals that were really useful for my general development even with some of the problems in trying to access materials across different vendor platforms.

Of course University libraries have supported Open Access for a long time now and hopefully this can continue so libraries are empowered to play their part in getting students attached to key information sources.  Students can then go on using and contributing to these resources, and other quality resources and peer reviewed activities, during the rest of their lifelong learning.  The possible death of publishing has been well documented elsewhere, all I would say is that the journals do not just need to be open/affordable but also as easy to use/access as any other thought leadership in the modern era.

Engaging with AIIM

Well passively following perhaps.  I’ve recently attended a number of webinars organised by AIIM (Association for Information and Image Management) and have been impressed with the conversation around #aiim and the quality of their website.

Indeed I am seriously considering looking further into the Certified Information Professional (CIP) accreditation.  If holders are out there do get in touch.

The CIP standard seems to have a comprehensive capability framework and covers a number of areas around record and data management, arguably ever more important for information professionals with the growth of electronic data.  Indeed the certification covers areas that the UK’s Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) is sometimes criticized for not covering in enough detail due to its wide scope.

AIIM’s European/UK body seems to make a lot of sense in an area that would probably be between CILIP and the British Computer Society (BCS) in the UK – or “bridge IT and business” as they advertise – similar to the Information and Records Management Society.

Is Google Play the sign Google no longer cares about me?

Okay, so its only a name change, but the death of the Android Market in preference to the Google Play Store seems a curious move from the big G.

Not that long ago I was becoming more and more Google, using Docs, Gmail, Reader and more.  However, even with an Android phone, I find myself looking at options elsewhere.  The ‘Play’ switch risks alienating the Enterprise and users such as me even more.  Okay I might buy the odd movie, book and music file but that is not a huge percentage of my expenditure.

This video perhaps shows why Play is like it is – going down the hardware route is shifting Google’s focus and I am not entirely sure it is for the better.

Perhaps Microsoft may yet come good via Windows 8.

The next twelve months is certainly going to be a big one in consumer and enterprise technology.