Remember when ‘Wikis were well wicked’?

[I drafted a long post about this a while ago, inspired by the alliteration and the Beastie Boys, but never posted it – this is an abbreviated version]

A while back it seemed Wikis were the answer to many of our ills – breaking down the barriers of web design, enabling creation of knowledge bases, an easy way to capture tacit and crowd-sourced content.

Social media and mobile, and MOOCs in HE, seem to have stolen the thunder of Wikis in more recent times.  Wikis indeed have probably just become a standard tool amongst the suite available to educators, knowledge managers and other professionals.  Their flexibility however means they remain a tool with huge potential.

It is then of interest to see the launch of Wikispaces Classroom a few weeks back – a wiki combining tools (such as ‘Projects’) to effectively build a LMS out of a long standing (as Web 2.0 tools go) product.  The below video introduces Classroom and does mention (toward the end) how it might be seen as LMS-lite functionality.

Seems like a great example of a c.2005 buzz tool evolving but maintaining their original spirit [well Wikipedia says it launched then so that was a good guess].  In my old role I maintained a departmental knowledge base on Wikispaces (my handover was effectively just a case of tidying this site up) – compare that to Rypple (that I used for feedback/ratings/team management in that role) which has now evolved to Work.com within the Salesforce suite and you get two quite different models of online tools evolutions.

Author: iangardnergb

My name is Ian Gardner and I am interested in various topics that can be seen as related to learning, technology and information. To see what I am reading elsewhere, follow me on The Old Reader (I.gardner.gb) and/or Twitter (@iangardnergb).

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