List of premium tools available for Covid impacted education institutions

FINAL UPDATE MARCH 19th 2020: obviously this is a pretty mammoth task now that more US and UK organisations have got involved (and the increase in HEIs closing). Overall, I would recommend looking at what you are due to cover from a learning perspective and working out best approaches from there. Obviously tools should come after topics/tasks/outcomes. Here’s hoping that the digital learning world gets some credit out of this and continues to evolve.

I could not find a definitive listing of these so below is my attempt. The primary source is an uber list being compiled by a Facebook group here but obviously not everyone wants to be on Facebook nor are Facebook groups very easy to find or moderate.

Yes, I know this would be better as a shared Google Doc, Google Sheet or Wiki but I was trying to avoid false advertising from opening up the editing to those pushing products.

Note these are where there there seem to be clear attempts at offering longer free trials than normal or specific, short term, free upgrades/accounts. This goes over and above ‘always free’ tools such as ft.com (via their schools programme) and YouTube (free to all). I will try to add to this over time:

  1. Kahoot – quizzing, games, etc.
  2. Century tech – one of the emergent AI assessment platforms that could break down the time spent on marking for teachers
  3. Google Hangouts/Google Education – largely irrelevant for Microsoft shops but I guess they are hoping to convert some work from homers
  4. Discovery Education – free access (for US schools) to the Discovery resource libraries
  5. Quizlet seems to have a 30 day trial for teachers, I think this is longer than normal (although the URL says it is the Black Friday deal) – quizzes and flashcards but the teacher version offers tracking of student progress and other tools
  6. Britannica School free during Covid closures – the long standing Britannica brand now in the form of eLearning resources around encyclopedia content
  7. Nearpod are offering additional support (webinars and staff development) as well as access changes (to get a trial you have to fill in what seems like a rather excessively long form)
  8. Twinkl Resources are apparently free if you contact them to upgrade existing accounts
  9. Minecraft EDU – extended access during Covid
  10. InThinking Distance Learning – resources for various subjects
  11. Gizmos simulations – 60 day free trials
  12. Bookcreator – upgrade to collaboration level use of the iPad tool
  13. BrainPOP – free access to their animated movies, assessment resources and creative tools
  14. Buncee – not familiar with this tool: seems to be a learning management system with some synchronous learning components
  15. Classwork Zoom – GoogleClassroom plugin (for student progress tracking)
  16. Education Perfect – lots of resources for K-12 subjects, currently available for free till May 1st. Powerful looking assessment engine, including proctored assessments.
  17. Elementari – “write and code interactive stories” (I might have to have a play with this one!
  18. Kami – “Kami is the leading PDF & document annotation app for schools”
  19. Lalilo – Phonics platform for early years
  20. Mangahigh – slightly confusingly (given the name) a maths platform with lots of resource based learning
  21. Mystery Doug – K-5 science video platform free till June 1st
  22. Parlaydiscussion and chat tool, free till April 30th
  23. PearDeck – formative assessment including MCQ, etc.
  24. Sutori – social science content, history examples on home page
  25. Tynker – coding platform with free trial, current 30% off beyond
  26. WeVideo – online video editor
  27. Zoom – amendments to the always free version (some geographies only?)
  28. Pearson qualification schools have access to (60 day trial) resources here

Have I missed something? Send me a tweet.

Note this excludes eBook platforms as they often tweak their “free” models between educator, parent and other uses – such as Epic!, Story Time from Space and Storyline Online.

Not technically the kind of list I was trying to create but an interesting one has also been setup over on this page: https://covid19edresources.glideapp.io/

Another big list over here on Wakelet: https://wakelet.com/wake/ebca9f61-b708-4674-b1f8-f684df739cf9

Another big list here: https://kidsactivitiesblog.com/135609/list-of-education-companies-offering-free-subscriptions/

MIT’s K-12 resources

Some resources here

IBO contingency guide

Master tools list from the Facebook group here (more of what I thought I had originally missed):

http://www.amazingeducationalresources.com/?fbclid=IwAR2u-X7HG4PEuf6SuGBtGovUY0eGYQk0w3q9Fxr7MaXcjoMsd9OID9BJenc

The support staff role (again): considering the library role (again)

At a minimum, learners and teachers should collaborate with librarians to design the places, collections and services of the library.

Planning with the entire community helps to make the library a welcoming, active space for learning, research, and reflection…

It is important that librarians do not find themselves undervalued or isolated from the school community, which can happen if the system is not designed to play an active role in energizing the curriculum. Librarians should be included in planning, teaching and learning to the greatest effect, rather than being “the last people to know” what is going on in the school.

Ideal libraries: A guide for schools (International Baccalaureate)

Consider the six roles the IB has identified as archetypes of modern librarian role. Then compare L&D’s re-visioning for 70/20/10 and other changes. Here we have traditional support roles desperate for ‘a place at the top table’ as I’ve discussed before.

Added later: After working in the library area again for the first time in a while it really strikes me how much of the library discourse in on rules, regulations, security, etc. This is in part why I looked to move away from libraries originally, that the focus is too often not on the actual outcomes – in academic libraries that learning and research actually happens! In some ways this is comparable to L&D – with both having to wear more hats than they would have traditionally:

I’ve learned a lot for my current role from an excellent couple of networking groups (one a Facebook group the other a more formal site using their own version of Moodle). Neither of these sites are provided by my organisation or an L&D team, these are prime examples of informal Personal Learning Networks contributing to performance. They are point of need Q&A channels beyond what any bot could provide – as they offer advice and ideas from outside of your organisation – a combination of “how do others do this” and “help please!” Often when we think about the support services we provide we think we can do this via support resources, often we simply have no access to the people our people really need – peers outside the organisation.

Learning and libraries: Will efforts to change always be Sisyphean?

A while back I tweeted challenging a view that L&D teams are still behind modern learner expectations:

Transformation is difficult in this world. For example, the need for libraries to be more open and engage with their communities exists – but a recent high-profile example shows the challenges. Whilst libraries may want to transform, do the users really want it? If the ‘customer’ does not want change then why are they trying it in the first place?

Here learning support services (such as L&D and library teams) have the challenge of trying to do what they think best versus non-domain expert/customer expectations. This is perhaps an effort that is so difficult, but needed, we have to recognise it is Sisyphean to some extent. One suspects it is an issue for all support staff? For example data protection pros slowly trying to improve practice, IT pros trying to get people to use tech better, etc. ??

A new identity: The Learning Reducer

Following on from my reflective posts in recent weeks about my experience, things I have seen in the workplace and the challenges the world faces I have come up with a title for myself: The Learning Reducer.

Inspiration (outside of learning)


instead of adding stuff, try taking stuff away” 


– Rick Rubin: http://erickimphotography.com/blog/rick-rubin/

The inspiration for this title is a combination of music producer/reducer Rick Rubin and what I have realised during this period of reflection.  Further logic behind the ‘reducer’ moniker:

“Girls” is indicative of Rubin, who initially portrayed his role as “reducer,” not “producer.” 1980s music had a lot of needless flourishes and additives. Rubin’s mission was to boil off excess and serve the essence. Rick is often portrayed as a producer who does almost nothing to the music he touches. Which isn’t to say that he does nothing. The opposite, in fact, is true. Like a great chef, he chooses the best ingredients and lets them speak for themselves. The genius is in the selection and arrangement of those ingredients.

In the case of “Girls,” it’s one part drums, one part piano, and four parts asshole.


DAN CHARNAS: https://www.complex.com/music/2012/03/25-best-rick-rubin-songs/girls

Inspiration (from learning)

In part my adoption of Reducer is based on some things that have really stood out to me during my time working in learning over the years, including:

  • Subject Matter Experts (or worse people responsible for something who are not even an SME) throwing requirements ‘over the fence’ to L&D whilst refusing to engage or find time for proper needs analysis.
  • Mandatory ‘training’ stipulated by government and other groups with no consideration for personalisation, real outcomes or other needs.
  • Bloatware learning where learning is elongated by everything from a corporate logo (even just for 5 seconds) at the start of a video through to fixing ‘learning’ into an arbitrary schedule of an hour, a work day, etc.  As a result organisations have been left with lots of legacy learning content that is difficult to manage, update and makes little us of the opportunities AI, AR and other tech gives us. 
  • Inefficiency – we hear a lot about productivity gaps but do very little about the basics around skills, process, etc.  There have been improvements in encouraging honesty and learning from mistakes but tackling fundamental bad practice, for example with Microsoft Office, remains an issue.
  • Self importance.  Unfortunately we all fall into the trap of thinking our piece of the pie is most important.  Realistically, the product/service of our organisation is most important and in big organisations we only contribute to (or sell) it.  Therefore, the need for learning to drive self aware and reflective practitioners is all important – what we don’t need are bloated learning (or other support teams) expecting the impossible or putting self interest ahead of the shared vision/goals.  There is also the snobbery issue here in self importance of learning professionals and a failure to support all learners – too often focusing on leadership and high level concepts.
  • The learning industry is in need of shedding a lot of dead weight (learning styles, Myers Briggs, etc).  We are seeing new ideas emerging but often people are clinging to ideas (like 70/20/10 in totally the wrong kinds of ways).  As an industry/profession it feels like learning pros constantly beat themselves up but are far too slow (still) in shedding the old sheep dip training for something that adds more value.  Admittedly because too often things are thrown over the fence as ‘requirements’ (see above).

Reducer as critical friend

So – can I be the learning asshole?  Well, perhaps I already am – I noticed myself verging into this territory recently when asked to give feedback on pre-launch content from new vendor Thrive and also with the UI of a recruiting platform I was given early access to.  

There feels like a value in looking at L&D from the perspective of critical friend.  Seperate from industry or SM expertise.  If only to ask a question of L&D pros practice: why?

What is applicable to super scientists is applicable to all.

Reducer and curation

Curation is not new – even though some L&D commentators would have you think it is.

Blog followers will know I get a bit of a “bee in my bonnet” about curation as an L&D topic.  However, it is a facilitator of ‘reduction’ – pick the best of what is out there and maintain current awareness without excessive build times and other traditional L&D activities.

Curation done well has to be part of a continuous improvement culture.

Reducer and culture

Through a learning reducer focus we can establish true learning organisations. 

Agile learning through experience and reflection, combined with ongoing collaboration via digital means.  Where face-to-face and virtual classroom are reserved for real value added sharing and relationship building.

Learning can be embedded in work, agile in deployment, is owned by everyone and contributes to learner/employee engagement.  This works both in education settings and the workplace.

What next?

Contact me to discuss further as I continue to develop this chain of thought.

UKeIG: Digital Literacy in the Workplace

This day workshop really ended up getting me thinking and my thoughts (as articulated below) are probably still not very tidy.

What does being ‘digitally literate’ even mean?  What does digital literacy look like?  What does it mean to different industries/sectors?  How does it compare to Information Literacy?

Perhaps predictably for a CILIP group event the first couple of presentations were quite focused on Information Literacy [in the SCONUL kind of sense] and the day did continue to think a lot about electronic resources and e-information.  This said, it did highlight how different people have different views on DL, for example mine would be more in line with the Belshaw model than how information professionals might consider the topic [note I tend not to call myself an info pro anymore!].

Key activities related to the topic were included in the day’s presentations, my interest in attending being particularly around the training of ‘clients’ (although a number of delegates made the point of not calling it ‘training’ to increase engagement), to up-skill staff and students (the latter for the large number of delegates working in education).  The “don’t call it training” advice will be well known by L&D folks and Wendy Foster’s session on the City Business Library made the point perfectly: it should be outcomes/WIIFM focused, i.e. not “database training” but “creating business to business contacts”.  eLearning was also mentioned as increasingly important for library/information professionals – and I made the point on Twitter that some of us have moved away from the ‘traditional’ profession via this route:

 

Personally, when I think about digital literacy, I’m thinking digital competency and capability.  This includes how people can be encouraged to be open to technological change, continue to develop their knowledge and skills within the requirements of their role and for possible future needs.  Indeed in the initial brainstorm of what it meant for us, I made the point of saying that it really can mean anything and everything.  I continued by arguing a need to “get on with it”, more than worrying about definitions, in a similar way to how L&D faffed about with what “coaching” meant only for people to go ahead and crack on with it (in various guises).

The different perceptions, semantics and language used around the topic continued to come up throughout the day and I couldn’t help but feel that businesses have adopted “digital transformation” as a buzzword, largely via IT Services, whilst a lot of professions have been left behind.  This is an interesting one for libraries/information considering eLib was a very ‘early’ series of service transformations (again for education – and a key part of my MA dissertation) that arguably (at least in my dissertation) was not followed through (or at least maintained).  eLib, however, is largely the cause of the LMS language divide between workplace LMS (learning) and UK higher ed (library – and use of VLE over LMS).  Anyways, I’m getting waylaid by semantics and history (which I tend to be)…

The day considered various pieces of research such as the ‘Google Generation’ which got me thinking about the laziness, ‘buzyitus’ and other factors which might be as important as UI/UX decisions:

 

A couple of sessions referenced Information Literacy in the Workplace by Marc Forster.  I don’t think I’ve ever looked at this [at c.£50 (it’s a Facet book after all) I’m unlikely to] nor the also referenced Information Literacy Landscapes by Lloyd.  Overall there remained a feeling that we were talking about a narrow subset of the digital skills I would consider people need.  I quite liked this model when reflecting on the day and Googling alternatives and, for workplace’s aligning to the apprenticeship standards, perhaps functional skills frameworks are the standard to be applied.

The JISC session nicely considered the wider issues (Flexing our digital muscle: beyond information literacy) but, unsurprisingly again, was very HE orientated – their model of “digital capability” however could be flexed for other environments.  Is the model of creation, problem-solving and innovation (in addition to an information focus) the way to go when thinking about digital skills – i.e. should they just be embedded at appropriate (Blooms taxonomy?) levels of technical capability?

Overall, there is a huge impact on productivity from information overload, a lack of digital skills and related issues.  If we (as in our organisations and the UK overall) are to improve perhaps we need to recognise this and invest in people for longer term impact and improvement.  Whilst one session, correctly, pointed out that work is about “KPIs not coursework” it is also an oversimplification.  As required skills are changed by technology the knowledge, skills and behaviours will change and be reinforced.  In terms of quick wins, the start point may well be developing some shared vocabulary within your own organisation to then support people with.